Imagination-Intoxication

I like art

"I put my heart and soul into my work, and I have lost my mind in the process." 
— Vincent van Gogh

"I put my heart and soul into my work, and I have lost my mind in the process." 

— Vincent van Gogh

(Source: suparlak, via queso-cum)

pixography:

Rene Magritte ~ "The Lovers", 1928

The origin of these disturbing images has been attributed to various sources in Magritte’s imagination. Like many of his Surrealist associates, Magritte was fascinated by ‘Fantomas’, the shadowy hero of the thriller series which first appeared in novel form in 1913, and shortly after in films made by Louis Feuillade. The identity of ‘Fantomas’ is never revealed; he appears in the films disguised with a cloth or stocking over his head. Another source for the shrouded heads in Magritte’s paintings has been suggested in the memory of his mother’s apparent suicide. In 1912, when Magritte was only thirteen years of age, his mother was found drowned in the river Sambre; when her body was recovered from the river, her nightdress was supposedly wrapped around her head. <source>

lakilester:

No one get’s lynched for exfoliating is the greatest come back I’ve ever witnessed.

lakilester:

No one get’s lynched for exfoliating is the greatest come back I’ve ever witnessed.

(via eresirena)

pixography:

Emily Deutchman ~ “Presidents with Boob Faces”, 2014

Presidents with Boob Faces" takes the tradition of presidential portraits and subverts their solemnity by transforming their faces with schoolboy ‘boob doodles’, twisting the historic grandeur of portraiture and national pomp with this lowbrow interjection of irony and humor.

The maker, Emily Deutchman states: “Although the placement of each boob doodle began as an intuitive, visual response to each individual portrait rather than a political statement, I invite political interpretations as to the satirical implications in using watercolors to paint female body parts on iconic masculine images.”